Americans Saving More and Spending Less

It would seem as though three years of economic turmoil would be enough to send anyone over the edge, but Americans are still being beaten down day after day with the debt crisis that is assailing not only us, but the entire world it seems like.

According to finance professor Werner De Bondt and his associate Richard H. Driehaus from De Paul University Center for Behavioral Finance, we are in a vicious cycle from which there appears to be no end. Americans are starting to feel the weight of the problems besetting them since the mortgage meltdown of 2008 ushered in what is being called “The Great Recession.”

Actually, the pair feels that, for the most part, Americans have three different reactions to the current financial problems besetting our economy. Some are angry at the debt crisis and the way in which government attempted a bailout. Others are expressing anxiety, not only about their own future but the future of our economy on the whole. A third group of people are simply resigned to the situation and feel that there may be no way out.

In a recent article in the Personal Finance section of the MSNBC website, De Bondt is quoted as saying that Americans “have had it…..with this whole thing,” referring to the elite group of Washington politicians and Wall Street big businessmen. He says that our worries are only natural if you look at what has been transpiring over the past few years.

Literally millions of Americans are out of work and have no hope in the near future of finding a job. Companies are downsizing, homeowners have been foreclosed on and millions of loans have gone into default. It seems as though the bubble burst just as many of us were pulling ourselves up out of debt that we incurred when the credit card wars lured us in.

For years, vying for our business, credit card companies were mass mailing credit cards to consumers around the country in order to get them to sign onto high interest rates. Unfortunately, tens of millions of us fell into the credit trap which led to bills we just couldn’t pay. For a while all went well until they kept raising our limits to the point where even paying the monthly minimum was beyond what we could afford.

At some point many people became aware of what they were doing to their credit scores and simply tore up those cards. Now they are paying the price for it because the economy is still on a downward spiral and it is becoming increasingly difficult to keep up with current bills let alone pay off old debt.

Actually, people are behaving fairly rationally, according to George Loewenstein, economics and psychology professor at Carnegie Mellon University. They are spending less, saving more and recognizing that the economy is not recovering as quickly as Washington said it would. The time has come to rely more on our own resources and less on government – a message which appears to have been heeded.

If you are looking for some sound advice to help you weather the current debt crisis, the first thing to do, as Loewenstein observed is save more and spend less. Secondly, keep tabs on your credit report. If you are like 90% of working class Americans, you are probably worried about whether or not your job will still be there tomorrow.

This means it is time to sincerely think about paying down the debt you have without running up any more. Make sure that your report details debt that is truly yours and not an error or case of identity theft. By keeping a tight reins on your finances and monitoring your credit, you should be able to withstand the current problems until the economy bounces back.

 

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