Workers Earning Less Now than at the Height of the Recession

If you have ever wondered why you don’t seem to be able to stay on top of your bills, a recent report issued by the New York Times can answer that question quite easily. You are probably earning at least 6.7% less than you were during the height of what is being called the Great Recession.

It is difficult enough to keep up with recurring bills such as utilities, rent/mortgage, automobile payments, credit card bills but when you are earning $6.70 less on every hundred you make, it is almost unbearable. Not only are you earning less, but prices just keep on going up. Inflation is at a breakneck speed and it does not appear that it will level off any time soon.

According to a study conducted by two former officials of the Census Bureau, the median household income is now at $49,909 which marks a total decrease of 6.7% from December of 2007 when the recession officially began. During the recession household income only fell 3.2% which is why it is so dismaying that we have fallen so low when Washington tells us the recession is over.

Americans are not only unhappy with the current state of affairs, they are downright angry. When polled, most people state that leaders are letting them down and that it’s politics as usual. This does not appear to be good news for either the Democrat or the Republican parties as the caucuses are in full swing.

President Obama is calling the financial situation an official ‘emergency’ and is asking for Congress to pass his jobs bill. Many analysts feel that it doesn’t stand a chance of passing even though there are some strong spots in the bill. However, at a cost of $477 billion, it is more than Washington is prepared to spend at the moment. The bill itself is a blend of public works, tax cuts and unemployment benefits which Republicans are none too pleased with.

The two men responsible for the report on the current state of household income, John F. Coder and Gordon W. Green, Jr. find that the American standard of living is significantly reduced. Oddly, our standard of living is reduced but joblessness is waning as well. They find that there are two main factors contributing to this situation.

First of all, there are growing numbers of people outside the workforce. These are categorized as those neither working nor seeking a job. The second factor is that hourly pay is being held low and is not in keeping with the rate of inflation. Of note are the rises in the cost of oil and food which have risen significantly. What is most surprising about these facts is that during the recession, wages rose faster than inflation.

The pair noted that a great number of people who became unemployed during the recession had to take a sizeable decrease in pay just to get a job again. In fact, the situation is so critical at the moment that many of the country’s leading economists claim that the recession is far from over.

For the average consumer in the United States, this means tightening our belts and really keeping an eye on our own debt. If all you can make is minimum payments, then at least keep up with them. Economists suggest that we charge less, pay more and watch our own personal finances. We could be in for the long haul if things don’t improve soon.

Also, take the time to keep track of your credit report because hard economic times also tend to lead to rising amounts of identity theft. Make sure to order your annual free credit report and score so that you can make sure that everything on your report is of your making. If not, dispute it as soon as possible. Times are not getting easier and you need to know that any debt on your report is fair and accurate.

 

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